Connect with us

Fashion & Style

After homemade mince for months, I’ve forgotten my restaurant etiquette | Restaurants

Published

on

A restaurant isn’t so much a vendor of food as a series of understood behaviours and expectations. It is as granular as how fast you walk in (not like a bull entering your own house, but slowly, like a welcome acquaintance, entering someone else’s); where you stand once you’re in and what face to make; how to read a menu; how to talk to the waiter; how loud your voice should be. I’ve forgotten it all. Or it’s all been capsized. Or some combination of those two things has happened. I’m doing it all wrong.

I’ve forgotten how to choose food, which is the worst of it. In all the sumptuous home cooking that’s defined the year so far, two critical groups have been forgotten – people who live alone and people who live with children. It is paralysingly difficult to justify fancy-pantsing around with interesting ingredients, just for yourself. It’s like trying to fashion yourself a really exquisite pun. I mean, you could. But why would you?

And it is morale-drainingly pointless making – to pick an example at random – a beautiful early summer pie of broad beans, only for someone to say: “Why are these peas the wrong shape?” And for someone else to say: “I would like it, except for the pastry.” And for yet another diner to say: “It would be OK if it was made of ham.”

So, really, only households of adults have been eating well. The rest of us have had mince every evening for five months.

Last night, I went to the pub and ordered the surf ’n’ turf sharing platter with a 10-year-old. I mean, who knows what it was even made of? It didn’t even look like reconstituted protein, more like the feast of a street whose freezers had all gone down on the same night. The week before, I ordered frankfurters. I’m eating like a baby. If there’s a bar, I wander up to it to order like it’s 2019 and have to be told off, then make a huge fandango of my apology, roaring “I’M SO SORRY”, in case someone thinks I’m one of those jerk libertarian rule-refuseniks. I need some kind of physio, hospitality baby-steps.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fashion & Style

Hair Colors That Will Trend in Fall 2020

Published

on

By

If banana bread had a publicist (and what a good publicist she’d be at this current juncture), you can picture her trembling at this fall’s upcoming hair-color trends — or at least inviting them out for brunch. Frankly, they sound downright delicious.

From “Champagne pop” to “espresso black,” these hues clearly take inspiration from the best things in life around you. They’re also designed for easy upkeep: “My current recommendation to any client would be a low-maintenance hair color, which means switching from permanent colors to demi- or semipermanent color, or balayage,” Karissa Schaudt, a colorist at Maxine Salon, told POPSUGAR. “These are created to have a seamless grow-out and require minimal upkeep — especially during a pandemic, when touchups aren’t as scheduled.”

Most importantly, added colorist Rex Jimieson: “This year, we want our color to transition gracefully into fall by staying away from overly cool or artificial colors. They are the hardest to wear as we lose our summer glow in our skin. I would stay away from blue-based dyes especially such as gray or extrastrong ash tones. They are great for editorial moments with the right makeup lighting and editing but are very fade-resistant and harder to wear against natural skin with no makeup.”

Need more concrete examples? For the most mouthwatering hair colors that are somehow — some way! — even better than they sound, keep reading. We’re breaking down the seven biggest color trends to try in the coming months ahead.


Continue Reading

Fashion & Style

The Most Iconic Sunglasses in Hip-Hop

Published

on

By

Originally released in 1990, the Cartier C Décor is the French luxury brand’s most influential silhouette. Recently, the late Pop Smoke, a fan of the sunglasses, created a demand for the style. The glasses are rimless, which gives the wearer the option to customize the lenses to be any color or shape.

“Back in the day, I don’t think that’s what Cartier intended, for people to customize all of their glasses like everybody is doing today,” says Julz, who typically sells “Big Cs” anywhere from $1,250 to $2,000. “Having rimless glasses allows you to literally make a one-of-one creation from Cartier. Really, you’re buying just temples and a nose bridge.”

However, no two C Décor frames are the same. The “Big C” Décor frames feature thin temples that boast a large “C” to hold the lenses in place—similar Cartier frames with smaller Cs are older models from the ‘90s. According to Vintage Julz, the “Big C” Décors have been underlooked until now. 

“I mean, the wires have always been just something light. Now they’re becoming a high ticket item. But back in the day I used to practically give them away,” says Julz, who credits the current popularity of “Big Cs” to Pop Smoke. “It was never as coveted as it is today.”

Julz sold his first pair of “Big Cs” in 2014 to rapper Meek Mill, who ended up wearing them for a freestyle performance on Power 105.1 with DJ Clue. But the Detroit is the reason why Meek Mill and every other rapper in the game wears Cartiers today.

“I remember Meek Mill used to come here and hang out with one of our rappers named Dusty McFly,” says Joseph McFashion, the Executive Producer of Buffed Up, a Detroit-based comedy centered on the quest for an expensive pair of C Décor frames known as “White Buffs.”Blade Icewood made it popular to put diamonds on The Woods. And Rich Ken made a song called “All White Buffies” that was big back in the day, too.”

Cartier’s presence in Detroit dates back to the ‘80s when working class car factory workers purchased them, and the late ‘90s, when members of the Black Mafia Family, a drug trafficking and money laundering organization, wore them. McFashion says the hype truly kicked off in the 2000s when local Detroit rappers like Rich Ken and Blade Icewood, began rocking the frames, which are also tied to violence in the city. The most popular models are the “Woods”—C Décor glasses with thick wooden temples—and the White Buffs—C Décor glasses that boast thick temples made out of white buffalo horn. Since there are no official Cartier stores in Detroit today, McFashion says the only way to attain a pair of White Buffs are through local jewelers like Gary Yee at Golden Sun Jewelery and resellers like Spencer Shapiro. And prices fluctuate depending on how white the Buffs are. 

“If they have swirls or they’re not the purest white, you can get those for like a pretty decent price, like $2,200-$2,300. If they’re the whitest buffs, the jeweler might charge anywhere from $2,600-$2,700,” says McFashion, who also says the current demand for buffs has boosted the prices. “You might pay almost $4,000 around here if they’re really white.” 

Recently, rappers like Lil Uzi Vert and Gunna have worn the iconic White Buffies. When McFashion was asked about the mainstream appeal of Cartiers outside of Detroit, he said he was happy to see his city’s culture get recognized.

“I feel like we’re leaving our impact on the industry now because Cartiers are something that started in Detroit, it was something that we kind of adopted as our own,” says McFashion. “We feel like a lot of people don’t even pay attention to Detroit. So when we see them wearing our fashion, we’re like, ‘Okay, they are looking at us.’”—Lei Takanashi


Continue Reading

Fashion & Style

Revolve surges on Q2 results

Published

on

By

Continue Reading

Trending