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Cam Newton has 2-word answer on his confidence in WRs

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It might be hyperbolic to say quarterback Cam Newton looked like the New England Patriots’ best receiver on a trick play when he made an 16-yard reception in a loss to the Denver Broncos in Week 6. But it was one of the most explosive passing plays of the day for New England — and Newton did break a tackle in impressive fashion in a way that no other receiver did.

Where is Newton confidence in his receiver?

“Extremely high,” he said.

The quarterback finished completing 68% of his passes but he threw for just 171 yards and had two interceptions. Damiere Byrd led receivers with three catches for 38 yards. N’Keal Harry couldn’t log a catch and Julian Edelman had just two catches for eight yards. Cam Newton was 6 of 13 (46%) for 62 yards when throwing to receivers. It was not pretty.

So with Newton having arguably his worst day as a Patriot, he was asked whether he stood by his comment earlier this season that New England had the requisite talent in the locker room at receiver. And his simple answer — “extremely high” — is yet another testament to his support of his receivers off the field, even if they’re not supporting him on the field. Newton took some blame for the final play for New England, a misfire to N’Keal Harry, who had gotten open on a route. Newton fired an uncatchable pass high and outside. It wasn’t clear, however, whether Harry ran the proper route.

“Well we didn’t execute the way we’re supposed to and that’s a lot. That was contingent upon me. I knew I was going to get hit,” Newton said after the game. “So I just tried to find a spot to give him, so he could make a play on it. There was a defender on the interior part stealing the field, so I still tried to give him an opportunity. So that’s what it came down to.

Newton isn’t giving up on his pass-catchers and he’s not throwing them under the bus.

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Fashion & Style

Clogs Shoes Are More Popular Than Ever

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Again, clogs aren’t a 2020 phenomenon. The clog’s turn for the fashionable has been talked about ever since the aforementioned Crocs runways. It was solidified when, in 2018, Maria Grazia Chiuri sent out a clog on the Dior runway — for the first time since 1954, according to Paper. But, as the Lyst report suggests, clogs may be at their fashion peak now — thanks to us being in a time when a customers’ needs intersect with the designers’ openness to make comfortable fashion. In addition to providing comfort that’s fitting for the lockdown age, which has no end in sight (thus, no limit to how many clogs you can buy), there is also a nostalgia associated with the shoe. A reminder of a simpler time, filled with gardening and hiking in clogs, which we have taken up again; and emblematic of the cottagecore aesthetic that has been prominent at the beginning of the pandemic, when at-home activities like baking bread and stocking up on houseplants were also at their peak popularity. When speaking about the new Hermès’ new collection, the brand’s creative director, Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, told British Vogue that it was all about “resurrection”: “You rest; you feel better; you recalibrate; you rediscover the most essential things.”

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Why Are Plus-Size Boots For Women So Hard To Find?

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This is hardly news for the plus-size community. One look at Twitter, and the topic is much discussed. “Can plus-size companies be more creative with their boots this year? Can we have thigh-high boots? Not over the knee, but legitimately thigh high,” asked EMM Fashion, a fashion consultant. “Can we get different styles, colors, and prints this year? Different heel styles? Lastly, can we get thick padding, as well? Thanks!” @Oveeoexxo tweeted: “Why is it so hard to find thigh-high boots for plus-size women? I’m so frustrated!” Tamara shared her frustration, too, and took to the platform to ask for suggestions: “Who sells ankle boots that fit plus-size legs? Can’t say I’m surprised but it seems a bit of a tough one.” Despite shoppers openly asking for options to buy, and plus-size boot collections known to sell out immediately, apart from a few one-off releases, the community continues to go under-served in the boot department. Why is that?


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Tiffany & Co. is opening a Blue Box Cafe in Orange County

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West Coast fans of the 1961 Audrey Hepburn classic “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” will finally get to live out their fantasy of dining at the famous jewelry store.

In December, Tiffany & Co. is opening a Blue Box Cafe at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa. It follows last year’s temporary Blue Box Cafe pop-up at the jewelry store’s Beverly Hills boutique and the 2017 launch of its first Blue Box Cafe at its New York flagship store. (The Fifth Avenue cafe is expected to reopen next year.)

Reed Krakoff, Tiffany & Co.’s chief artistic officer, said the jewelry brand’s relocated and newly designed Costa Mesa boutique, expected to open in November, was a natural choice for its latest bistro, which will seat 38 guests.

“It’s an incredible space,” Krakoff said. “It’s pretty rare that we have the space. We have the right location. We have the customer who appreciates that.”

The exterior of the new Tiffany & Co. store in South Coast Plaza, as envisioned in a rendering.

The exterior of the new Tiffany & Co. store in South Coast Plaza, as envisioned in a rendering.

(Tiffany & Co.)

The Blue Box Cafe will offer a menu similar to its New York counterpart, with American classics made from regionally sourced ingredients. Although initially the cafe will offer limited service because of coronavirus restrictions, the plan is to offer full service next spring.

The new Tiffany & Co. eatery will follow local guidelines with inside dining available at limited capacity. (Unlike Los Angeles, Orange County restaurants were allowed to resume indoor dining at 25% capacity as of early September.)

Fans of the brand will be in for much more than breakfast when they visit the new South Coast Plaza location. The 12,000-square-foot boutique is almost double the size of the brand’s recent space. Tiffany & Co. has had a presence in the shopping center since opening there in 1988. The brand’s previous space was last renovated in 2003.

“This store really embodies the best of Tiffany retail right now,” Krakoff said of the store. “It has the space and the scale where we can really tell the whole story of this chapter of Tiffany’s — and the next chapter of Tiffany’s.”

Krakoff, former executive creative director of Coach, joined Tiffany & Co. in 2017 and was tasked with modernizing the legacy jewelry brand. “The biggest challenge has been, and always will be, how do you celebrate Tiffany’s heritage without feeling like you’re stuck in the past,” he said. “It’s a delicate balance. I spent a lot of time in the archives when I began and tried to absorb everything I could. And then I put it away and worked on things that felt interesting, things that felt different, things that felt like they were missing from the assortment.”

EMBARGOED UNTIL 10/19/2020 @ 8 A.M. - Rendering of the new Tiffany & Co. love and engagement room.

A rendering of the love and engagement room at the new Tiffany & Co. store in South Coast Plaza.

(Tiffany & Co.)

Krakoff said the South Coast Plaza store is its highest-volume store in the United States outside of New York and, therefore, will have the largest assortment of rare, diamond and colored gemstone designs from Tiffany & Co.’s high jewelry collection.

The Orange County location will also be the first North American store to exclusively preview the Tiffany T1 collection’s Tiffany T1 bangle and ring in 18-karat rose-gold with baguette diamonds, the latter of which retails for $7,500. The new styles reinterpret the brand’s “T” design, which was introduced in the 1980s.

In terms of the store’s interior design, the new boutique will feature a custom Tiffany Wheat Leaf wall crafted in carved stone, a hand-painted mural by New York artist Yoon Hyup, as well as hand-embroidered murals, plus a custom chandelier made of hand-cast crystal cylinders and an oversize portrait of Tiffany‘s founder, Charles Lewis Tiffany.

“It’s an entirely new store concept,” Krakoff said. “It’s a way for us to tell broader, bigger, more impactful stories, to highlight product in a different way, to show jewelry in a new way, and to essentially to excite the customer.”

EMBARGOED UNTIL 10/19/2020 @ 8 A.M. - Rendering of the jewelry room Tiffany & Co. store in South Coast Plaza.

The showroom for high jewelry at the new Tiffany & Co. store in South Coast Plaza.

(Tiffany & Co.)

The space also will also include a Tiffany Blue Box gift wrapping station as well as a personalization counter where customers can get items engraved on-site.

Tiffany & Co. has had a long presence in California with 18 stores, including its Beverly Hills store, which opened in 1966. “We have a connection that’s real and genuine with Hollywood and Los Angeles,” Krakoff said. “ ‘[Breakfast at] Tiffany’s’ is arguably one of the most famous movies that a brand is associated with. … It’s something that is really embedded and part of the Hollywood history.”

The brand has continued its close association with cinema and the zeitgeist. Lady Gaga wore Audrey Hepburn’s Tiffany diamond to last year’s Oscars, and Lizzo recently appeared dripping in Tiffany diamonds on the October cover of Vogue.

Despite the recent wins, the brand has had a major setback. Last November, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, whose jewelry brands include Bulgari and Tag Heuer, announced it was acquiring Tiffany & Co. in a $16.2-billion deal. However, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the French luxury conglomerate pulled out of the agreement in September. As a result, Tiffany & Co. is suing LVMH, and LVMH has countersued.


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