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Hong Kong-Based Designer Yeung Chin On His Love Of Traditional Craftsmanship

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Hong Kong-Based Designer Yeung Chin On His Love Of Traditional Craftsmanship

Designer Yeung
Chin in his studio at PMQ in Central (Photo: Affa Chan/Tatler Hong Kong)

By Tara Sobti

By Tara Sobti

October 19, 2020

Fashion designer Yeung Chin describes his love of traditional craftsmanship and his bid for a seat in Legco

For Hong Kong-based designer Yeung Chin, fashion should be a spectacle. Take a peek at his fall-winter 2020 collection and you’ll see how that ethos comes into play with avant-garde silhouettes, creative fabrics and unusual textures. Using asymmetrical lines and mixing eastern and western influences, Chin pushes the boundaries of Hong Kong’s typically conservative fashion scene to carve out his own style.

The 39-year-old made his mark with a string of international fashion week presentations, including in Tokyo, New York, Milan, Hong Kong and Paris. “I get my inspiration from art and society,” says the Guangdong-born designer, who is standing to represent the textile industry in Legco. “I can tell the world what’s happening in Hong Kong through my work. Fashion is art and it’s an expression of thoughts, stories and political views.”

In 1999, when he was 19, Chin thought he’d become a sports teacher. But his then-girlfriend’s love of fashion piqued his interest and that year, he enrolled at the Clothing Industry Training Authority in Hong Kong. He followed up with a night course in fashion design at the Hong Kong University Space, which fuelled his hunger to perfect his craft and make a name for himself.

See also: 18 Asian Fashion Designers Who Are Doing Us Proud

Some of Chin’s recent designs (Photo: Max Chan Wang)
Some of Chin’s recent designs (Photo: Max Chan Wang)

“I met my instructor Chiu Kwong-chiu in college. He referred me to a fashion designer named Silvio Chan, who to this day is my mentor and now my muse. Though he isn’t a famous designer, his talent and capability are far beyond others. I’ve always admired his desire to keep learning,” says Chin.

After solidifying his nous with a masters degree in fashion design from the University of Westminster in London in 2009, Chin moved back to Hong Kong and by 2010 had already captured the attention of the retail giant G2000. He joined the brand as chief designer and learned more about the business side from founder Michael Tien. After four years, Chin left to start his eponymous label, which is now carried by retailers across North America, Europe and the Middle East.

Though his career highlights include designing costumes for the Asia Society Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, the City Contemporary Dance Company and the Cheers Exhibition in London, Chin’s true passion lies in mentoring young creative professionals. As a guest lecturer at the Hong Kong Design Institute, he helps foster the city’s next generation of fashion leaders and promotes traditional Chinese craftsmanship. He spent the last year learning techniques from the Miao, an ethnic minority group in southern China known for distinctive techniques, such as batik, embroidery and folding.

See also: 4 Things To Know About Christine Nielsen, Founder Of Fashion Label Hyun Mi Nielsen

I get my inspiration from art and society. I can tell the world what’s happening in Hong Kong through my work

Yeung Chin

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Fashion & Style

Clogs Shoes Are More Popular Than Ever

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Again, clogs aren’t a 2020 phenomenon. The clog’s turn for the fashionable has been talked about ever since the aforementioned Crocs runways. It was solidified when, in 2018, Maria Grazia Chiuri sent out a clog on the Dior runway — for the first time since 1954, according to Paper. But, as the Lyst report suggests, clogs may be at their fashion peak now — thanks to us being in a time when a customers’ needs intersect with the designers’ openness to make comfortable fashion. In addition to providing comfort that’s fitting for the lockdown age, which has no end in sight (thus, no limit to how many clogs you can buy), there is also a nostalgia associated with the shoe. A reminder of a simpler time, filled with gardening and hiking in clogs, which we have taken up again; and emblematic of the cottagecore aesthetic that has been prominent at the beginning of the pandemic, when at-home activities like baking bread and stocking up on houseplants were also at their peak popularity. When speaking about the new Hermès’ new collection, the brand’s creative director, Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, told British Vogue that it was all about “resurrection”: “You rest; you feel better; you recalibrate; you rediscover the most essential things.”

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Billie Eilish Posts Nike Sneakers Version of ‘The Dress’

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Billie Eilish divided the internet this weekend when she posted her own version of The Dress on her Instagram Story. Eilish had been doing a fan Q&A when she was asked about the original dress image. She said she saw gold and blue and posted an IG Story of the image as proof. Then she shared an optical illusion of her own, recalling her dad incorrectly saw her Uptempo Nike shoes as pink and white. He wasn’t the only one though who saw those colors, thought, and Eilish wasn’t having it.

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The shoes are actually mint and white, although in warmer indoor light, the white on the “Air” photographs as light pink. Eilish posted several images of the shoes against other sneakers with pink and white in them and then took them outside, where the mint and green are more clearly visible.

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At one point, Eilish had her mother look at them, and her mom told her she saw pink and green.

“Yeah, so I’ve come to the conclusion that you guys still don’t know your sneakers at all because the people that agree with me, because they know what the fuck the shoe looks like, are all people who are sneakerheads that know what the fucking Uptempo mint green shoes look like,” she told her Instagram followers, exasperated. “I don’t care what you think they look like; I care what they are!”

“Calm down,” Eilish’s mom said off camera.

“No dude, I’m still pressed about this. Because the whole internet is gaslighting me!”

“There are bigger problems in the world…” her mom replied.

Eilish laughed: “You’ve got me there.”

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Eilish then took the shoes outside, posted videos of them against other pink and white shoes, then went back inside and told the internet to let her have this.

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“So we all know that I’m right here even if you see something else. You know that I’m right underneath it all, right?” she said. “And real quick: before you keep arguing or whatever the fuck, the entire internet’s been calling me fat for a week, so let me have this.” (Eilish is referring to trolls’ response to paparazzi photos taken of her wearing a camisole and shorts. In response to that, she reposted a TikTok saying people need to normalize real bodies.)

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Harry Winston’s Kaleidoscope Collection Bursts with Colored Gems – Robb Report

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Known for its rock-size white diamonds, Harry Winston introduced an explosion of colored gemstones in its new high-jewelry this season. The collection is decked with pink-red spinels, aquamarines, tanzanite, rubellite, pink morganite and blue sapphires. The inspiration was a gold and diamond malachite kaleidoscope pendant, topped off with malachite from the jeweler’s archive, which contains a multitude of colored stones beneath a magnifying glass that move when the piece is turned—just like a child’s toy but somewhat more expensive. The original piece, which dates back to the mid-90s, was sold this month at Sotheby’s “Magnificent Jewels” collection in Hong Kong for HKD 252,000 (approximately $32,514). Other one-off iterations have been created, like this 18-karat yellow gold kaleidoscope in diamonds, sapphires and Paraiba tourmalines, which comes topped off with a detachable timepiece, have since been created by the house, but this year Harry Winston took a less literal approach using the patterns of colored stones on palm-size pendants and delicate jewelry watches.

Harry Winston's Kaleidoscope Necklace Sold at Sotheby's "Magnificent Jewels" Auction

Harry Winston’s Kaleidoscope Necklace Sold at Sotheby’s “Magnificent Jewels” Auction 

Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The Harry Winston Kaleidoscope Collection is an extraordinary example of the house’s collaborative efforts,” Nayla Hayek, CEO of Harry Winston told Robb Report. “From dynamic designs, to extraordinary colored stones and masterful techniques in gem-setting and craftsmanship, each piece embodies the enduring spirit of the House through a more modern, and playful interpretation.” The collection is comprised of 32 pendants, two of which have already sold to a single collector through the New York flagship on Fifth Avenue. The client is said to have bought one for herself and one for her mother. They come in small, medium or large sizes on long chest-length 30-inch chains that can be doubled to wear closer to the neck.

Harry Winston Kaleidoscope Pendants

Harry Winston Kaleidoscope Pendants 

Courtesy of Harry Winston

Robb Report reviewed some of the collection via a private appointment at the Fifth Avenue boutique and can report that the pictures here do not do them justice. Each pendant is an incredibly vibrant cluster of colors—an effect achieved using the minimum amount of platinum to set the stones in order to achieve maximum sparkle.

Harry Winston Kaleidoscope Pendant in Aquamarine, Sapphires, Rubellite and Diamonds

Harry Winston Kaleidoscope Pendant in Aquamarine, Sapphires, Rubellite and Diamonds 

Courtesy of Harry Winston

“One of the aspects that make the fine jewelry pendants so spectacular is the way they’re set,” says Hayek.  “Each stone is arranged in a three-dimensional pattern, with no gaps or spaces, in order to maximize the light returned, resulting in a pendant that’s full of brilliance and life.”

Harry Winston Premier Kaleidoscope Watch

Harry Winston Premier Kaleidoscope Watch 

Courtesy of Harry Winston

Eleven watches accompany the pendants: five high-jewelry pieces and six Premier models. Beneath the sapphire crystal, each dial of the 36 mm Premier timepieces reveals a 3D explosion of shapes and patterns of stones set against a mother-of-pearl backdrop. They come in 18-karat gold cases with alligator-leather straps and house an automatic mechanical movement.

Harry Winston High-Jewelry Kaleidoscope Watches

Harry Winston High-Jewelry Kaleidoscope Watches 

Diode SA – Denis Hayoun

The high-jewelry watches, perhaps more suitable for a black-tie gala or red-carpet affair, are set in platinum cases with the gems encircling the dials on the outside of the case. Each comes with 71 brilliant-cut diamonds and are mixed in spiraling patterns in a variation of tsavorites, orange sessartites, aquamarines, rubies and blue, pink and yellow sapphires. Each houses a quartz movement and comes on a satin strap set with a clasp accented in 29 brilliant-cut diamonds.

The pieces are price upon request, but a handful are currently on display in Harry Winston’s New York City boutique (until October 23rd).


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