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Marni apologizes for controversial ‘Jungle Mood’ campaign

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Marni is the latest fashion brand to take heat for an offensive campaign.

This week, the Italian luxury brand posted images of its new Jungle Mood campaign which featured an image of a black man with a purse superimposed over him, and what appeared to be shackles on his feet. Another image showed a sandal being held up with the caption “Tribal amulet.” Fashion watchdog Diet Prada picked up on the campaign, posting, “The images begin alluding to racist, colonial stereotypes of black people as primitive, uncivilized and unmodern people.”

Marni has since removed the images and issued a public apology, stating, “We are deeply apologetic for the harm and offense . . . What was intended to be a campaign that celebrated the beauty of the Afro-Brazilian culture through the perspective of Brazilian photographer Edgard Azevedo came to fruition having had the opposite impact. Our oversights across the review process are unacceptable — and for that, we are incredibly sorry.”

In 2019, Gucci apologized after releasing a balaclava that evoked black face and Burberry apologized for making a hoodie with a noose.


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Fashion & Style

Lirika Matoshi’s Internet Famous Strawberry Dress Comes in Mask Form

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Fashion & Style

Billionaire Girls Club and ENVSN Launch Showcase For Artists of Color

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Pharrell’s Billionaire Girls Club has teamed up with ENVSN festival to host a virtual art showcase focusing on work from artists of color. ‘Stories of the HeART’ will be streamed via Instagram on Thursday at noon ET, featuring artists from the worlds of spoken world, photography, and painting. 

They include NYC writer, painter, and activist Ashley Chew, writer and poet Kyla Lacey, and a panel of photographers capturing the current civil rights movements across the world. Rising cinematographer Annie Bercy will also host a screener of her new project An Ode to the Strong & Proud Black Women in the 2000s.

You can see the full lineup and schedule on ENVSN Festival’s official website. The event is scheduled to start at 12 p.m. ET, and will run until 5 p.m. over on @billionairegirlsclub‘s Instagram and Hopin.


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Fashion & Style

A Billionaire Art Collector Is Commissioning a $1.5 Million Diamond-Studded Face Mask

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Imagine you have a cool $1.5 million sitting in your bank account right now, just waiting to be spent. 

Then imagine dropping that money on a bespoke, bedazzled face mask at the height of a global recession and pandemic that’s laid painfully bare what the stratification of wealth means for those on the lower end of the spectrum.

Well, that’s exactly what one art collector is doing. He’s commissioned what Isaac Levy, owner of the Yvel jewelry company, is calling the most expensive face mask in the world. 

The mask, which is currently being worked on by 25 Yvel jewelers in Israel, is constructed from 250 grams of 18-carat gold, boasts 3,600 black and white diamonds, and features an N99 filter. It’s expected to be delivered by the end of this year. 

A prototype of the mask. Courtesy of Yvel.

A prototype of the mask. Courtesy of Yvel.

“Money maybe doesn’t buy everything, but if it can buy a very expensive COVID-19 mask and the guy wants to wear it and walk around and get the attention, he should be happy with that,” Levy told The Independent.

Levy has not disclosed the name of his client, but has called him, in various reports, a “Chinese art collector living in the United States” and an “anonymous billionaire from Shanghai.” 

“He is a young-old customer of ours, very charming, very outgoing, very wealthy and he likes to stand out,” the jeweler told the AP.

Sources tell us that if you ever meet a man with, say, a roll of gold leaf toilet paper or disposable toothpicks made from rhinoceros horns, or if you ever see someone using a small child as an umbrella—that’s probably your guy.  

“For a lot of people around the world it may be the most expensive mask in the world and maybe that’s a really big thing,” Levy added. “For us, it’s a way to protect the positions of the people in the factory in order for them to be able to support their families.”

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